Posts Categorized: Dog Training Tips

Crate Training Your Puppy

What is crate training and why can it be useful to have your dog crate trained? This article will discuss what it is, when it is appropriate, and how to go about crate training your dog in such a way that he enjoys being in his crate for small periods of time.

Why It Is Important to Crate Train Your Puppy

Crate training is very helpful especially in the initial stages when potty training your puppy. However, crate training is not something to be done in order to have your dog spend long periods of time in his crate without breaks and without human interaction. The crate is not his permanent home, just a tool that can be used to further other portions of your dog’s training.

The most important reason to crate train your dog is that it will help with potty training. Dogs do not enjoy soiling in their dens. So, while in their crates, dogs will be less likely to have an accident. This can speed up the potty training process.

In addition, your dog should be comfortable being in a crate so that you can easily transport him in a crate, if needed.

Tools and Materials Needed to Crate Train Your Dog

A crate – it should be just large enough for your dog to stand up and turn around in

Food or treats

How to Crate Train Your Dog

A lot of the process of crate training involves how you make the crate seem to your pup. You should never use the crate as a place for punishment. This will make your puppy have negative associations with his crate and you do not want that.

First, allow your dog to get to know the crate without any pressure. Leave the crate in an area where you and your pup can be together. Keep the crate door open and pup your dog’s bed of favorite blanket in the crate. Allow your dog to explore the crate, going in and out of it freely. Do not rush to shut the door. Your goal in this step is to have your dog feel safe and comfortable in and around the crate.

You can add some treats or food to the crate to entice him to go in and explore if he is a little fearful. If your dog is not interested in food or treats, try tossing his favorite toy in the crate.

It is very important that you do not rush this step! The crate must be a place where your dog feels comfortable, so take your time and allow him to explore it on his own terms. Never force your dog into the crate.

Once your dog is comfortable with the crate and shows no signs of fear, you can begin feeding him in the crate. This will allow him to experience something pleasant in the crate, thus making it a safe space for him.

While your dog is eating in his crate, close the door. Leave him in there for a short period of time after he has eaten (10-20 minutes) and then let him out again.

When your dog gets to the point where he loves going into his crate for his meals, you can start to leave him for longer periods of time. Before leaving the house and leaving your dog in the crate for the first time, try it out while you are home but out of sight. That way you can assess your dog’s reaction to being left in the crate while no one is around.

Some Points to Keep in Mind

Do not make a big deal out of leaving. No long goodbyes to your dog as this can generate anxiety and create separation issues. Crate your dog normally and always remember to have a positive association. Tossing a treat in the crate is usually a good way to get your dog to go in happily.

When you get back home, do not greet your dog enthusiastically or reward hyper behavior. Wait until your dog has calmed down in his crate before letting him out. This will teach him that calm behavior will be rewarded, rather than hyper behavior. This will also decrease the chances of him undergoing separation anxiety.

Do not leave toys in the crate that he may choke on. Most times it is best to supervise your dog while he plays with his toys.

Consider taking off his collar while he is in the crate so there is no change of it getting caught in anything.

And, do not forget this crucial point – the crate must be a positive place. Never punish your dog by sending him to his crate!

Hiring a Dog Walking Service Can Help

You do not want the crate to be a place of confinement for your dog for hours on end each day. If you have to work long hours, it is a good idea to hire a dog walking service that can come and let your puppy out one or more times during your work day.

Want to set up dog walking visits tailor-made to your puppy’s needs? Contact us today!

What Do the Experts Say?

Cesar Milan

Puppy Crate Training Made Easy

https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-care/lifecycle/puppies/Puppy-crate-training-made-easy

Victoria Stilwell

How to Get Your Puppy to Enjoy the Crate

https://positively.com/dog-behavior/basic-cues/how-to-get-your-dog-to-enjoy-the-crate/

Read More Dog Training Articles

Did you enjoy this article? Read more articles in our series:

Train Your Dog to Leave It

Teach Your Dog to Drop It

How to Train Your Dog to Heel

Train Your Dog to Come When Called

Potty Training Your Puppy

Teaching Your Dog to Sit

Does your puppy love his crate?


How to Train Your Dog to Leave It

When training your dog, many basic commands are crucial for your dog’s safety and well-being. One of the things that you should learn right away is how to train your dog to leave it. This command is critical, and this article will discuss why. Also, the article will help you to learn how to train your dog to leave it and what the experts say about training your dog to leave it.

Why It Is Important to Learn How to Train Your Dog to Leave It

Like the command “drop it,” the command “leave it” is important because it can keep your dog safe. When on a walk, you can tell your dog to “leave it” to keep him from picking up something that would be damaging to his health or potentially hurt him. Even in your home, if you drop something (such as medication) on the floor and your dog scrambles to get it, if you have taught him the command “leave it,” you can ensure that he does not ingest something he should not.

Therefore, when picking which things you want to teach your dog, make sure that training your dog to leave it is on your list.

The command “leave it” is different from “drop it.” When teaching “leave it,” you are instructing your dog not to pick something up in his mouth. The command “drop it” is used instead if the dog has already picked something up.

Also, if you have trained your dog properly, you can use the “leave it” command not only to keep him from picking something up from the floor, but also to keep him from chasing a squirrel, lunging at another dog, and so on.

Tools and Materials Needed to Teach Your Dog to Leave It

Two stacks of treats

Leash

Toys

Lot of patience and many sessions

How to Train Your Dog to Leave It

As with all training, start off with less challenging sessions and gradually increase the difficulty of the training.

Place a treat in your closed fist and present it to your dog. More than likely, if he is food-motivated, he will try to get to the treat. Do not allow your dog to get the treat. As soon as he stops trying to get the treat, use the command “leave it!” and give him one of the tasty treats. Do not give him the treat that is in your closed fist. Otherwise, you are defeating the purpose of the training.

Repeat this time and time again until your dog is no longer interested in the closed fist that offers him a treat.

Once your dog is no longer interested in the closed fist, increase the difficulty by opening your hand while giving the “leave it” command. Remember, do not allow your dog to take the treat! If your dog attempts to take the treat from your open hand, close it quickly. Once your dog ignores the open hand as you are giving him the command “leave it,” reward him with a treat from the “fun” stash of treats. Under no circumstances should you give him the treat in your hand. You do not want to confuse things for your dog.

Repeat this many times over until your dog knows that he cannot take the treat from your open hand when you use the command “leave it.”

Gradually increase the difficulty by placing the treat on the floor while cupping your hand over it. When your dog learns to leave that treat alone and ignore it, move to the next step. Take your hand off of the treat while telling your dog to “leave it.” Keep your hand close by in case you have to retrieve the treat quickly so that your dog cannot steal it. Once he leaves the treat on the floor when you tell him to “leave it,” reward him with a treat from the good stash.

Again, you will need to repeat this portion of the exercise many times. Your dog must get to the point where he does not attempt to take a treat that you have placed on the floor. Do not move too quickly on to the next step so that you do not set your dog up for failure.

When your dog is comfortable and has accomplished leaving the treats in the above circumstances, you can once again increase the level of difficulty by placing your dog on a leash and tossing a treat (or toy) on the floor, while telling your dog to leave it.

Have your dog on leash so that he does not manage to reach the toy (or treat). Once your dog stops trying to get to the treat, reward him by giving him a treat from the good stash.

Repeat this exercise often and remember to keep reinforcing the “leave it” training at different times. You can purposely drop something on the ground and tell your dog to leave it to enhance the training.

Some Points to Keep in Mind

Do not allow your dog to get a toy or treat that you have told him to leave. It will be confusing to the dog if he receives as a reward the treat he was supposed to “leave.” The command will thus be rendered invalid, or, at best, very confusing to him.

What Do the Experts Say?

Victoria Stilwell

Victoria teaches “leave it” command in 6 steps

https://positively.com/dog-behavior/basic-cues/leave-it/

Cesar Millan

Cesar discusses 5 essential commands to teach your dog. Among these is “Leave It”

https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-training/obedience/5-essential-commands-you-can-teach-your-dog

More Dog Training Articles

Have you enjoyed reading this article? Read more dog training articles in the series:

Teaching Your Dog to Drop It

Train Your Dog to Heel

How to Train Your Dog to Come When Called

Potty Training Your Puppy

Teach Your Dog to Sit

Have you successfully trained your dog to leave it? What is your favorite tip on how to do so?

 


Teaching Your Dog to Drop It

Teaching your dog to drop it may not seem like a priority in the list of things that you need to teach your dog, but, as we will see in this article, it is important that you take the time to do so.

Why It Is Important to Learn How to Train Your Dog to Drop It

Teaching your dog to drop an item when it is in his mouth is critical because it can save your dog’s life. For instance, let’s say you are walking your dog, and he gets ahold of a chicken bone (unfortunately people seem to think it is OK to eat chicken and toss the bones in the grass, not realizing that a dog can easily get ahold of it).  You must be able to act quickly to get your dog to drop it without eating it first.

Another important reason to be able to get your dog to drop an object that he is interested in quickly is that it can save your furniture or other precious objects in your home. Your dog may not know the difference between his chew toy and your expensive leather shoes, so it is a good idea to have him trained to drop an object on command.

Tools and Materials Needed to Teach Your Dog to Drop It

  • Patience
  • Some of your dogs favorite toys
  • Treats

How to Train Your Dog to Drop It

Patience

As with anything else you are training your dog to do, the number one tool you need in your tool belt is patience. Patience will help you not to give up if your dog does not seem to understand what you are trying to get him to do right away.

Just like humans, dogs can take a few tried before they learn. And that is OK. With patience, you will not expect too much of your dog too soon, and this will allow the exercise to be fun for both of you, rather than something to dread.

The Process

Allow your dog to hold one of his favorite toys in his mouth.

Now, it is imperative that you do not make this a game of chase or tug-of-war. Your goal here is to get your dog to release the toy in his mouth upon your command. If you pull at the toy, you will be teaching your dog that this is a tug-of-war session. If you go after your dog to try and get the toy away from him, you will be teaching him that this is a game of chase or keep-away.

Claim the toy for yourself. Get your dog to come to you. Once your dog has the toy in his mouth, you can place your hand on a portion of the toy (it will be easier if this is a larger toy) and hold the toy. Just hold, do not pull. At the same time, give your command, “Drop it!”

To get your dog to release the toy quickly, you can use one of the treats and, once again, use the command and show your dog the treat. Once your dog has dropped the toy, reward him with the treat.

Repeat this over many times until your dog drops the toy without you giving him a treat and without you having to claim the toy for yourself. The goal here is to get your dog to learn to drop anything that is in his mouth as soon as he hears the command, “Drop it!”

Some Points to Keep in Mind

Again, remember that, as tempting as it may be to chase your dog when he does not come to you, or to pull on the toy to get him to let it go, you will not be teaching your dog properly if you do so. Your dog should complete the action of dropping the toy on his own. This way he will learn to make the connection with the command.

It is important to wait it out as well and have patience. If you have called your dog to you, wait until he comes to you. If you have asked him to drop it and he is trying to play tug of war, hold the toy and do not allow him to pull on it. Patiently wait until he releases it.

Use the treats as necessary. Do not forget, however, that the goal is to get your dog to the point where he releases the toy without receiving a treat. This is important because, in a life-threatening situation, you may not have a treat handy to get him to release.

What Do the Experts Say?

Victoria Stilwell

In this article, Victoria helps you to teach your dog to learn to take a toy while dropping another one.

https://positively.com/dog-behavior/basic-cues/take-it-drop-it/

More Dog Training Articles

Have you enjoyed reading this article? Read more articles in our dog training series:

How to Train Your Dog to Heel

Train Your Dog to Come When Called

Potty Train Your Puppy

Teach Your Dog to Sit

Train Your Dog to Leave It

How did you teach your dog to drop a toy?


How to Train Your Dog to Heel

Among the many things that you need to teach your new dog, learning how to train your dog to heel is a vital skill for both your dog’s safety and your peace of mind.

Why It Is Important to Learn How to Train Your Dog to Heel

Training your dog to heel is important because it makes the walk more enjoyable for both of you. It is no fun to walk your dog feeling like your arm is about to be yanked out of its socket for most of the walk.

Also, your dog’s safety is at risk if your dog does not know how to heel on the walk properly. You want to be able to have your dog under control to be able to navigate busy streets or crowded places safely.

Tools and Materials Needed to Teach Your Dog to Heel

Treats (if your dog is food-motivated) or a toy

A leash

How to Train Your Dog to Heel

Start training your dog to heel inside, rather than outside, with as little distraction as possible.

If your dog is food-motivated, use a treat to help him focus on you. Show the treat to your dog and then hold it again the side of your body while you walk. Your dog should follow you (or actually, the treat). Walk for a bit then stop and reward your dog with the treat.

When you stop, be sure to use a command, such as “stop!” or “sit!” so that your dog knows to stop and sit at this point. Having the dog sit whenever your stop is another way to keep your dog safe. You can have your dog sit at each crosswalk so that he is not tempted to pull out into the street while you are walking.

Repeat the exercise several times inside before moving outside. Always remember that the key to properly training your dog is to have much patience and to move slowly. Do not rush to train your dog outside if she has not yet mastered the training inside. If you move too quickly, you may be setting your dog up to fail, and this can be frustrating for both you and your dog.

When moving outside, be sure to pick a quiet spot to start off; somewhere without too many distractions. Being in a quiet area will help your dog to focus on you rather than what is going on around you. Again, your goal is to give your dog plenty of opportunities to succeed before moving too quickly into more challenging training scenarios with distractions.

Do the same exercises you did inside, but this time, since you are outside, have your dog on the leash.

Repeat the exercise several times and remember to practice this often.

Be sure to give your dog some breaks where she does not have to heel, but can sniff around at leisure. Just make sure that you, and not your dog, are the one deciding when your dog should heel and when it is OK just to sniff.

Once your dog has mastered heeling while walking in quiet areas without distraction, move on to areas where there are more distractions. Remember to be patient and to practice often. Do not expect your dog to learn everything in one session.

Some Points to Keep in Mind

Bear in mind that, when working with your dog on leash, you should not have tension on the leash. Maintain the leash loose and do not jerk your dog around. If you keep tension on the leash, your are, in fact, training your dog to fight against that tension.

It can help to keep your dog’s collar toward the top of his neck, which is his most sensitive area and therefore, he will be less likely to resist and to pull.

What Do the Experts Say?

Victoria Stilwell

Victoria stresses the important of teaching your dog to heel by starting inside rather than outside where there are more distractions in this artcile: https://positively.com/dog-behavior/basic-cues/heeling/

Cesar Millan

Cesar discusses the importance of your body language and energy when teaching your dog to heel on the walk.

https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-training/walking/problems-on-the-walk

Read More Training Articles

Did you enjoy reading this dog training article? Check out more in the series:

Potty Train Your Puppy

Teach Your Dog to Sit

Train Your Dog to Come When Called

Teaching your Dog to Drop It

Train Your Dog to Leave It

Have you trained your dog to heel? How long did it take you to do so?


How to Train Your Dog to Come When Called

teaching your dog to come when called

When you get a new dog, whether it is a puppy or new to your home, it is important to learn how to train your dog to come when called. This article will discuss why training your dog to come when called is important and how you can teach your dog to come when called. In addition, it will provide information from the experts so that you can get their take on the matter as well.

Why It Is Important to Learn How to Train Your Dog to Come When Called

Training your dog to come when called is not just a matter of having a cute trick to show off, but rather, can be a matter of life and death for the dog. It is important to have a dog that responds quickly to the “Come!” command.

Having your dog trained to come when called is also important in that it can save you a lot of time, energy, and frustration when trying to get your dog back in the house, or to get it to come to you so you can trim its nails, give him medication, and so on.

Therefore, teaching your dog to come is a vital part of training your pup.

Tools and Materials Needed to Teach Your Dog to Come on Command

  • Patience and perseverance
  • A 6-foot leash
  • A 15-to-30-foot leash
  • Treats
  • A strong bond with your dog

How to Train Your Dog to Come When Called

Patience and perseverance

No dog (or person, for that matter) can learn everything perfectly with just a couple of tries. You will need many consistent sessions with your dog. Also, you will need patience so that you do not get frustrated when your dog messes up.

A 6-foot leash

Begin by having your dog on a 6-foot leash. Decide on your command, will it be “Come!”, “Fido, come!” or some other version of that? Be consistent with your choice of command.

Allow your dog to get distracted by something while on a leash. Back up a few feet, facing your dog, and have a treat at the dog’s nose level. Squat down, use your chosen command and reward your dog with the treat or affection when he comes. If needed, you can give one or two gentle tugs at first to encourage your dog to come.

Practice this many times over (in various sessions) until your dog comes without any leash tugging on your part and without always getting a treat. It is imperative that you not move on to the next step until your dog is completely comfortable with this step and can do it without getting a treat. You do not want to move too quickly otherwise your dog may not learn to consistently come when called.

A 15-to-30-foot leash

Once your dog has mastered the portion of the training with the 6-foot leash, he will be ready to move on to the 15-to-30-foot leash.

Having the longer leash will allow you to get farther away from your dog. Repeat the basics that you did with the 6-foot leash, but go a bit further away from your dog each time. Once you are away from your dog, use your the command you chose, give a gentle tug on the leash if needed, and reward your dog with a treat (or lots of affection and praise) when he comes.

Once your dog has mastered coming to you when you are the full length of the leash away from him, you are ready to move him to off-leash training.

Be sure to keep him in a secure and contained area, such as a dog park or a fenced back yard. Get far from your dog and use the command you chose. Reward him with lots of praise when he comes.

To up the stakes, add distractions, such as other people or dogs, and have your dog come when called, even in the midst of distractions. Getting your dog to come while distracted may take a bit of time and lots of effort, but it is imperative because your dog should learn that when he hears the command, he is to come no matter what is going on around him.

A Strong Bond with Your Dog

Having a healthy relationship with your dog is critical in teaching your dog to come consistently. Your dog should look to you for all of his instruction. Reward your dog often for making eye contact with you, even if just with praise or a smile. Do things together and develop a strong bond that will make you the central and most important person in your dog’s life.

recall training

Some Points to Keep in Mind When Training Your Dog to Come on Command

Be sure to practice very consistently and slowly before moving up from the 6-foot leash to the 15-to-30-foot leash and the fenced area. It is a case of quality being more important than quantity. It is not about how quickly your dog learns to come when called, but how consistently he comes when called. Therefore, aim for 100% consistency before moving on to the next step in the training process.

If your dog is not responding well, remove any distractions. Try jogging backward, away from your dog, to encourage him to follow you. Sometimes clapping your hands may help.

Some common mistakes to avoid:

  • Getting upset if your dog does not come right away and punishing him when he does. Do not punish your dog when he comes to you. Otherwise, you are teaching him the opposite of “come!” You are teaching the dog that, if he comes to you, he will be punished. Therefore, even if it takes your dog a while to come, be sure to praise him once he does come.
  • Having your dog come to you only for something unpleasant. If your dog hates getting his nails trimmed, do not use the command in that unpleasant scenario until your dog has fully mastered the command. Moreover, even then, you want to be sure to continue to use the command for pleasant things, not just unpleasant ones.
  • Moving toward your dog when you call him. Always jog away from your dog. Otherwise, he will think this is just a fun game of chase.

What Do the Experts Say About How to Train Your Dog to Come When Called?

Victoria Stilwell

https://positively.com/dog-behavior/basic-cues/recall-come/

Victoria has four stages to teach your dog to come to you when called. Bellow are the four videos for each of those stages.

Stage One

 

Stage Two

Stage Three

Stage Four

 

Cesar Millan

https://www.cesarsway.com/cesar-millan/cesar-quotes/cesars-rules-excerpt-3

Cesar talks about some of the reasons dogs will not come when owners call them and why it is imperative that you teach your dog to come when called.

Read More Training Articles

Did you enjoy this article? Read more articles in our training series:

Train Your Dog to Leave It

Teaching Your Dog to Drop It

How to Train Your Dog to Heel

Potty Train Your Puppy

Teach Your Dog to Sit

Have you ever tried to teach your dog to come when called? What are some things that worked (or did not work) for you?


potty training your puppy

How to Potty Train Your Puppy

potty training your puppy

When people adopt a puppy, one of THE most important things to learn is how to potty train that puppy. So, how do you learn how to potty train your puppy? It may seem to some to be a complicated process but really, with patience and dedication, potty training your puppy is not an insurmountable task. Also, it is important to keep In mind that the result is peace and tranquility in the household with a happy pet and a stress-free owner. 

Why It Is Important to Learn How to Potty Train Your Puppy

While this may seem pretty obvious, it does bear delving into in a bit of detail. Who wants to come home after a long day of work and have to clean up accident after accident left by the dog? That is stressful and frustrating. Who wants to have a dog that cannot be left alone for more than an hour or two for fear that he will soil the house?

Among the many reasons people surrender dogs to shelters, is the fact that they are not potty trained. However, it is important to keep in mind that every dog can be potty trained, as long as the trainer is patient and dedicated. 

Tools and Materials Needed to Potty Train Your Dog

  • Patience, and lots of it! Dogs do not learn to go outside in just a couple of days or even a couple of weeks. You must be patient; very patient.
  • Determination. Do not give up at what may seem like the dog’s inability to learn. Stick to it because the dog can, and will, learn, if you do not give up.
  • A strict schedule. This type of program is imperative, especially in the beginning, as will be discussed in further detail below.
  • Cleaning products. Accidents are bound to happen. It is not a matter of if, but when. How you clean up the accidents, though, will have a huge bearing on whether or not you are successful in your potty training effort. 

How to Potty Train Your Puppy

  • Limit your dog’s space. Keeping your dog confined to a smaller space is something that is very helpful when potty training your pup. The reason is that it works with your dog’s instinct of not soiling in the same place where he sleeps. Therefore, crating your dog during the potty training period when you have to be away from home is extremely useful. However, please note that it is only effective if you will be back in time to take him out. If the puppy gets used to soiling his crate and laying in it, you are slowing down the learning process tremendously.

Be sure also to limit your dog’s space when you are home but unable to pay close attention to his movements. In this case, you can put your dog in a larger area, like a playpen, but be sure to check constantly to ensure that your dog does not need to go to the bathroom.

  • Give your puppy plenty of opportunities to do the right thing. Take your puppy outside frequently so that he can eliminate in the appropriate place. Puppies should go out approximately every two hours, depending on their age. As your dog grows older, the length of time it can hold it will also increase.

Outside, pick a particular “bathroom spot” so that your puppy associates this area with elimination. It is also useful to have a phrase that encourages your pup to go, such as, “Go potty!” In this way, your puppy will get an audible cue, as well as the cue from the scents in his bathroom spot.

  • Watch for signs that your puppy needs to go out. Your puppy will often give you clues when he needs to go outside to relieve himself. Unfortunately, not all dogs give the same clues, so it is important that you observe your puppy carefully to make sure you do not miss the signs.
  • Keep a strict schedule. Dogs thrive on schedules and routines, so keep as tight a schedule as your personal schedule allows. Take your puppy out first thing in the morning, preferably at the same time each morning. Feed your puppy around the same time each day and take him out right after he has eaten.
  • Praise. Praise is critical because our dogs love to please us. They get a thrill from doing the right thing to make sure happy. As soon as your dog eliminates outside, praise as though he has won the lottery. Do this each and every time he eliminates outside.
  • Clean-up. People often overlook this crucial aspect of potty training. Dogs have a much keener sense of smell than we do. This means that, should your puppy have an accident while learning, you must clean the area thoroughly and in such a way that the dog will no longer detect a trace of that accident. While the area may smell clean to you, your dog’s keen sense of smell may tell him otherwise. If it does, he will be tempted to go potty in that area again. Therefore, to clean the area, use something that completely takes out the smell. I love using Nature’s Miracle. For me, it is something that has worked well always. White vinegar is also an option that has worked well for me during many a potty training session. 

Some Points to Keep in Mind

When your puppy wakes you up in the middle of the night to go outside, do not use this time to play with him. He will quickly learn that, when bored in the middle of the night, he can wake you up and you will play with him. That is not your goal. Take your puppy out quickly and as quietly as possible, praise him lavishly for doing his business outside, and then quickly come back inside and go back to sleep.

When you catch your puppy in the act of making a mistake in the house, do not punish him, but rather, interrupt him by making a loud noise and taking him outside immediately so he can do the right thing. Praise him once he goes potty outside.

Do not give up! The time and energy you put into training your new puppy now will pay off a hundred times over when you have a well-behaved dog that you can trust not to soil the home. 

What Do the Experts Say?

Cesar Millan

Tips on How to Potty Train Your Dog

Do’s and don’ts for housebreaking your puppy.

https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-training/housebreaking-issues/housebreaking

A short video on how to help your dog get used to his crate:

Housebreaking for an Adult Dog

What if you rescued an adult dog that is not potty trained? Here are some tips from Cesar Millan to help you.

https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-training/housebreaking-issues/the-secret-to-housebreaking-adult-dogs

Victoria Stilwell

Different methods to potty train your dog, including crate training and paper training.

https://positively.com/dog-behavior/puppy-knowledge/puppy-housetraining/ 

Using a Dog Walking Service Can Help

Since most people do not work from home and, even those who do, may have to be away from home part of the day sometimes, using a dog walking service can be an invaluable tool during the crucial puppy training period. A dog walking service can send a dog walker during your preferred time frame so that you can maintain your schedule of potty training with your pup, even when you cannot be there.

Many pet parents have used our dog walking services at PAWSitive Strides to help during this training period.

Want to learn more about our services? Contact us today for walks tailored specifically to fit your needs and those of your pup!

Read More Dog Training Articles

Did you enjoy this article? Read more articles in our series:

Train Your Dog to Leave It

Teaching Your Dog to Drop It

Train Your Dog to Heel

How to Train Your Dog to Come When Called

Teach Your Dog to Sit

 


How to Teach Your Dog to Sit

teach-dog-to-sit

One of the first things people want to do when they get a dog is to learn how to teach the dog to sit. However, is it just something cute to have your dog do, or are there any benefits to having a dog who is trained on how to sit? Actually, teaching your dog to sit is a very important part of training your dog.

Why It Is Important to Learn How to Teach Your Dog to Sit

Learning how to train your dog to sit is quite important for a few reasons:

  1. Your dog learns to look to you for direction

Because your dog has to listen and follow your command, you are not just training your dog to you are, in reality, training your dog to follow directions that you give. This is an essential skill for your dog to have and will help with other training as well.

  1. Being able to have your dog sit when you need him to can help to redirect his energy and his focus from something else

This skill is crucial. For instance, let’s say you are walking your dog and someone else is coming toward you also walking a dog. You want your dog to focus away from the dog coming toward him so that he can remain calm and polite. What is the first thing you need to do? Get your dog to sit.

  1. Being able to have your dog sit when you need him to is the first step in getting him to calm down and wait

For example, I was speaking to a client yesterday who taught her gorgeous lab to sit before getting her food. She did this because she said her dog would be extremely rambunctious at feeding times and would jump up and down and even head-butted her once. The solution? She taught her to dog sit and to wait while she prepared her food. The dog was only allowed to leave her “sit position” when the owner gave the OK. This helped to save the owner considerable stress and made the dog have a task to focus on while the food was being prepared.

Tools and Materials Needed to Teach Your Dog to Sit

The advantage is that you do not need any special tools to teach your dog to sit. All you need is patience and calm energy. Do get frustrated or assume you are doing something wrong if your dog does not learn it right away. Dogs can sense if we are frustrated or stressed and this passes on to them, which makes it harder for them to learn.

So, make this a fun experience for both you and your pooch. It should be a time for bonding and relaxation. It is not boot camp.

The only other thing you need are some treats. Most dogs will work quite hard to get a treat, so this will speed up the learning. Remember also that praise is a huge treat for your dog so you can do a combination of treats and praise when teaching your dog.

How to Teach Your Dog to Sit

  1. Start off with a treat in your closed hand
  2. Get on your dog’s level and hold the treat close to his nose and move your hand back toward his rear end
  3. Your dog’s nose will follow your hand and, as it does, his rear end will go down into the sit position
  4. As soon as his rear end touches the floor, let him have the treat. Then, give him lots of praise
  5. Repeat

Some Points to Keep in Mind

  • Do not spend very long periods of time teaching your dog. It can be very tiring for him and you. Rather, do the training in short windows and make it fun for both of you.
  • Never force your dog to sit by pushing down on his rear end.
  • Reinforce the learning by having your dog sit before feeding, sit before getting his leash on, sit before leaving for your walk, sit at the door before coming back in and so on. Doing this not only reinforces the training, but it also makes sit so much more than just a cute trick. And it speeds up his learning.

What Do the Experts Say?

Victoria Stilwell

 

Victoria Stilwell recommends using treats or toys to teach your dog to sit. She recommends patience and perseverance while teach your dog to sit. She also recommends never forcing a dog to sit by pushing down on it.

Cesar Millan

Cesar recommends practicing pack leadership and calm assertive energy with your dog at all times in order to best help train him. He also notes that it is important to keep training sessions short and to keep your dog wanting more rather than tiring him out and having him get discouraged. Above all, both Cesar and Victoria recommend having lots of patience. It takes time for all of us to learn new things and the same time should be given to your dog.

More Dog Training Articles

Did you enjoy reading this article? Read more articles in our dog training series:

Train Your Dog to Leave It

Teaching Your Dog to Drop It

How to Train Your Dog to Heel

Train Your Dog to Come When Called

Potty Train Your Puppy

Have you taught your dog to sit? What has worked well for you?